“I wanted to show how intimately connected the natural world is to the human world. How we are a part of Earth and all its creatures and cannot afford to think of ourselves as separate from nature.”

The natural world is a constant presence in Helen Humphreys’s novels, from The Lost Garden, to the untamed places the dogs escape to in Wild Dogs, to birdsong in The Evening Chorus.

“I wanted to show how intimately connected the natural world is to the human world. How we are a part of Earth and all its creatures and cannot afford to think of ourselves as separate from nature.”

This world is a constant presence in Helen Humphreys’s novels, from The Lost Garden, to the untamed places in Wild Dogs, to birdsong in The Evening Chorus. Her newest book, The Ghost Orchard, was inspired by the discovery of a tree – the Winter Pear Pearmain, believed to be the world’s best tasting apple – growing beside an abandoned cottage near her home.

The book digs into the complex past of the apple in North America, exploring the links between agriculture, settlement, human relationships, and even the poetry of Robert Frost.

Her previous works have won or been nominated for numerous awards including the Trillium Book Award, the Rogers Writers’ Trust Prize for fiction, the Toronto Book Award, and the Governor General’s Award, and have been named as Globe and Mail Best Book of the Year, and New York Times Editors’ Choice.

Kingston’s poet laureate for a four-year term, Helen has long been a leading light and generous mentor within the city’s vibrant writing community, and beyond. Born in Kingston-on-Thames, England, she has lived in Kingston for nineteen years and has a riverside country property near Bellrock.

Appearing in: 13. Observations on Nature: Memoir, 22. Poetry Reading and Art Show Launch

www.hhumphreys.com
www.harpercollins.ca/the-ghost-orchard